Episode Summary

Kelly and Dermot discuss the recurring phrase "Agenbite of Inwit" and why Stephen repeats it over and over on June the sixteenth. Other topics included in the discussion are Buck Mulligan as nagging conscience, the gothic horror of growing up Irish, Catholic guilt and whether or not Stephen would have been better off praying at his mother's bedside.

Episode Notes

Kelly and Dermot discuss the recurring phrase "Agenbite of Inwit" and why Stephen repeats it over and over on June the sixteenth. Other topics included in the discussion are Buck Mulligan as nagging conscience, the gothic horror of growing up Irish, Catholic guilt and whether or not Stephen would have been better off praying at his mother's bedside.

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Agenbite of Inwit

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Further Reading & Listening:

Beplate, J. (2007). Stephen's lyrical language: memory and imagination in Ulysses. Études anglaises, vol. 60,(1), 42-54. https://www.cairn.info/revue-etudes-anglaises-2007-1-page-42.htm?contenu=article

Burgess, A. (1968). ReJoyce. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

Ellmann, R. (1959). James Joyce. New York: Oxford University Press.

Gibbons, L. (2015, Dec. 3). The ghosts in James Joyce’s modern machine. The Irish Times. Retrieved from https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/the-ghosts-in-james-joyce-s-modern-machine-1.2451708

Gifford, D., & Seidman, R. J. (1988). Ulysses annotated: Notes for James Joyce's Ulysses. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gilbert, S. (1955). James Joyce’s Ulysses: a study. New York: Vintage Books.

Music:

Our theme is:

Noir - S Strong & Boogie Belgique

About the Show

A blog and podcast that discuss James Joyce's Ulysses from a non-academic point of view. Less snooty, more movie references.